Drawing on memories

memory-media1

Patti had a birthday last month, the 22nd we’ve celebrated together. When you’ve been together as long as we have, you have to think  a little hard at birthdays and anniversaries and Christmas time to keep things fresh, to make sure that you can still express how much you love each other without falling back on the tried and trite.

Anyway, this year, I decided that one of the ways I would commemorate our history together was to take our ancient home movies and transfer them onto DVDs so we could watch them over and over. We have scads of old video tapes but the cameras that recorded and played them are long defunct. In fact, we have never looked at any of them since we initially shot them – films of our first trips together, of our wedding, of Jack’s early days and so on, all moldering in shoe boxes. Now we have a dozen gleaming DVDs, a box set of our lives up to about 1997 or so.  We have all watched them together over and again, particularly the ones when Jack first learned to use the potty and his first big argument with us on a trip  to Nova Scotia.

One of the more profound DVDs is the one I made when Patti had her accident and I was alone each night at home with the baby. For two months, I made videos of our daily life to take up to the hospital to show Patti that we were okay, that life was going on, that she had something to come back to. These are the hardest tapes to watch because I feel so sorry for the me that was, giving Jack a bath, rocking him to sleep, listening to music (Teddy Bear’s Picnic, The Ugly Bug’s Ball, Let’s Go Fly a KIte…) that was once so sweet and important to us but forevermore will signify the hollowness of those days.

Funnily, the more I got into drawing, the less video tape I shot. As the films peter out, my journals expand, so our whole life is recorded but just in very different media — and with very different effect. I read recently that when you look at old photos, they stir up old memories, facilitating recall. But when you look at old home movies, those images tend to actually replace your memories of the periods being recorded. When you think back on those times, your brain tends to pull up scenes from the films rather than organic (but not necessarily as reliable) memories. My mum had an 8 mm. movie camera when I was a baby and the images from those old reels are the only scenes I can remember from when I was two or three or four. Maybe nobody has much memory from that time, and mine are quite vivid, but I know they are all just scenes from one movie or another.

When I watch these old movies, I sort of vaguely remember the times when they were taken. When I look at these old videos, my experience is often of surprise. I think about how young well look, or weird my hair was, or how I seem to speak out of the side of my mouth. The experience is from outside — I am watching myself but not as myself. In fact I would venture that most of my experience is not radically different from what a total stranger or an acquaintance might think of the same footage.

The drawings in my journals, however, summon up a completely personal and intimate feeling. It’s more like a time machine than watching TV. I am in the moment, I am me now and also the me I was then.The act of drawing, painting and writing rather than just pushing a button on a  machine, forms completely different sorts of memories, When I look back at a page, even one that’ s more than a decade old, I remember so much about what I was doing that day, my mood, the weather, even the smells in the air. The experience itself is deeply embedded in my head and just glancing at the drawing takes me back there.

I am so glad to have both sorts of records of my past (not to mention dozens of photo albums and zillions of digital snapshots). I can travel back to any period of my life now and see my life as a continuum. There are so many lessons to be learned by looking back and seeing where one has come from, who one has known, how one made choices, how one felt.

Creating these records, particularly the ones that consists of just some feeble drawings and a few scratchy notes, is probably one of the most important things I’ve done. That sounds odd perhaps, that recording and observing one’s life could be of the most important things one can do with it, but that is the true purpose of art — at least to me. The value of taking a step back, of putting a frame around a moment so that it can stand for a thousand other moments unrecorded, to learn from one’s mistakes and to cherish one’s blessings, to hold up one’s experience so that others can share it and learn from it,  these things seem like the very purpose of art — and of life as well.

15 thoughts on “Drawing on memories

  1. I know what you mean about the old movies replacing your actual memories of childhood. I started keeping sketchbooks seriously about 5 years ago and I do have a lot of memories in there. I am not planning on stopping my sketchbooking habit anytime soon!

  2. Hi Danny, thanks so much for sharing with us your thoughts on these memories. I've started drawing again last year, in part because of your wonderful books. I still want to cry when I remember my first lesson of life drawing (march/2008), because of the true emotion I felt the moment I grab the charcoal pencil. keep drawing — your art is really alive in our hearts & soul.

  3. Danny, I love this post and seeing these movies. Is that Frank walking with Patti as she leaves the police station? I remember you mentioning him.

    I feel the same way about "framing" memories. Thanks for sharing some of yours from all media!

  4. Danny,
    Interesting and thoughtful post and it's great to have you back! What's the music behind your wedding dance?
    Frank

  5. wow, such youth, in those videos. Such love.
    and you're soo right. I have so many PHOTO memories, that are permanent, when the sketches are real. real memories and smells and emotion.
    Love you Danny, so glad you're BACK!
    xoxo

  6. If you like old movies, you might enjoy this site I just discovered.
    It's a collection of old monster movies, shot in Super 8 and 16 mm. by kids and starring kids. All made in the 50s-70s. I love them.
    Your pal,
    Danny Gregory

  7. What a thought provoking post Danny – that our memories are shaped by the forms in which we also capture them… and how wonderful to see snippets of your past – the young couple so much in love. I am always impressed by the imaginative gifts you think up for Patti – it says a lot about you :)

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